ACCA Applied Skills & Strategic Professional

The ACCA Fundamentals and Professionals levels, when combined with approved practical experience, form the full ACCA qualification and are structured to nurture respected, well rounded, global finance professionals

Specialisation

Towards the end of the qualification, students can choose to specialise in management disciplines, practice (audit and taxation), or a combination of the two. The opportunity to specialise is what attracts many to this world-renowned qualification. If you choose advanced audit and assurance in your final stage you will be legally able to sign audit reports in practice after obtaining your audit certificate.

Applied Knowledge & Applied Skills

This level has nine areas of study, divided into two modules. The Applied Knowledge module gives you a broad introduction to financial and management accounting (See Diploma in Accounting & Business)

The Applied Skills module covers the main technical subjects you need to know and consist of the following papers:

(LW)  Corporate and Business Law
(PM)  Performance Management
(TX)  Taxation
(FR)  Financial Reporting
(AA)  Audit and Assurance
(FM)  Financial Management

(LW)  Corporate and Business Law (English)

Aim
To develop knowledge and skills in the understanding of the general legal framework, and of specific legal areas relating to business, recognising the need to seek further specialist legal advice where necessary.
On successful completion of this paper candidates should be able to:

  1. Identify the essential elements of the legal system, including the main sources of law
  2. Recognise and apply the appropriate legal rules relating to the law of obligations
  3. Explain and apply the law relating to employment relationships
  4. Distinguish between alternative forms and constitutions of business organisations
  5. Recognise and compare types of capital and the financing of companies
  6. Describe and explain how companies are managed, administered and regulated
  7. Recognise the legal implications relating to insolvency law
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of corporate fraudulent and criminal behaviour

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The syllabus is assessed by a two-hour computer-based examination.
The examination consists of:

Section A 25 x 2 mark objective test questions (50%), 20 x 1 mark objective test questions (20%)
Section B 5 x 6 mark multi-task questions (30%).

All questions are compulsory.

The CBE exam can be taken at Reed Business School.

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

(PM) Performance Management

Aim

To develop knowledge and skills in the application of management accounting techniques to quantitative and qualitative information for planning, decision-making, performance evaluation, and control

On successful completion of this paper, candidates should be able to:

  1. Identify and discuss the information, systems and developments in technology required for organisations to manage and measure performance.
  2. Explain and apply cost accounting techniques.
  3. Select and appropriately apply decision-making techniques to facilitate business decisions and promote efficient and effective use of scarce business resources, appreciating the risks and uncertainty inherent in business and controlling those risks.
  4. Identify and apply appropriate budgeting techniques and methods for planning and control and use standard costing systems to measure and control business performance and to identify remedial action.
  5. Assess the performance of an organisation from both a financial and non-financial viewpoint, appreciating the problems of controlling divisionalised businesses and the importance of allowing for external aspects.

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The syllabus is assessed by a three-hour computer based examination. Prior to the start of the exam candidates are given an extra 10 minutes to read the exam instructions. All questions are compulsory. The exam will contain both computational and discursive elements. Some questions will adopt a scenario/case study approach. Candidates are provided with a formulae sheet.

Section A of the exam comprises 15 multiple choice questions of 2 marks each.

Section B of the exam comprises of three case style questions. These each contain five objective test questions of two marks each which are based around a common scenario.

Section C of the exam comprises two 20 mark constructed response questions. The two 20 mark questions will come from the decision-making techniques, budgeting and control and/or performance measurement and control areas of the syllabus.  These questions may also include requirements related to the information systems area of the syllabus. The section A questions and the questions in section B can cover any areas of the syllabus

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

(TX) Taxation (UK)

Aim

To develop knowledge and skills relating to the tax system as applicable to individuals, single companies, and groups of companies.

On successful completion of this paper candidates should be able to:

  1. Explain the operation and scope of the tax system and the obligations of tax payers and/or their agents and the implications of non-compliance
  2. Explain and compute the income tax liabilities of individuals and the effect of national insurance contributions (NIC) on employees, employers and the self-employed
  3. Explain and compute the chargeable gains arising on individuals
  4. Explain and compute the inheritance tax liabilities of individuals
  5. Explain and compute the corporation tax liabilities of individual companies and groups of companies
  6. Explain and compute the effects of value added tax on incorporated and unincorporated businesses
  7. Demonstrate employability and technology skills

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The syllabus is assessed by a three-hour computer-based examination.
All questions are compulsory. The exam will contain both computational and discursive elements.
Some questions will adopt a scenario/case study approach.
Tax rates, allowances and information on certain reliefs will be given in the exam.
Section A comprises 15 objective test questions of 2 marks each
Section B  comprises three questions each containing five objective test questions.
Section C comprises one 10 mark and two 15 mark constructed response questions.
The two 15 mark questions will focus on income tax (syllabus area B) and corporation tax (syllabus area E).
All other questions can cover any areas of the syllabuss

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

(FR) Financial Reporting

Aim

The aim of the syllabus is to develop knowledge and skills in understanding and applying accounting standards and the theoretical framework in the preparation of financial statements of entities, including groups and how to analyse and interpret those financial statements.
The financial reporting syllabus assumes knowledge acquired in Financial Accounting (FA), and develops and applies this further and in greater depth

On successful completion of this paper candidates should be able to:

  1. Discuss and apply a conceptual and regulatory frameworks for financial reporting
  2. Account for transactions in accordance with International accounting standards
  3. Analyse and interpret financial statements
  4. Prepare and present financial statements for single entities and business combinations in accordance with International accounting standards

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The syllabus is assessed by a three-hour computer based examination.
All questions are compulsory. The exam will contain both computational and discursive elements.
Some questions will adopt a scenario/case study approach..

Section A of the computer-based exam comprises 15 objective test questions of 2 marks each.
Section B of the computer-based exam comprises three questions each containing five objective test questions.
Section C of the exam comprises two 20 mark constructed response questions.

The 20 mark questions will examine the interpretation and preparation of financial statements for either a single entity or a group. The section A questions and the other questions in section B can cover any areas of the syllabus.
An individual question may often involve elements that relate to different subject areas of the syllabus. For example the preparation of an entity’s financial statements could include matters relating to several accounting standards.
Questions may ask candidates to comment on the appropriateness or acceptability of management’s opinion or chosen accounting treatment. An understanding of accounting principles and concepts and how these are applied to practical examples will be tested.
Questions on topic areas that are also included in Financial Accountant (FA) will be examined at an appropriately greater depth in this paper.
Candidates will be expected to have an appreciation of the need for specified accounting standards and why they have been issued. For detailed or complex standards, candidates need to be aware of their principles and key elements.

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

(AA) Audit and Assurance

Aim

The Audit and Assurance syllabus is essentially divided into five areas. The syllabus starts with the nature, purpose and scope of assurance engagements, including the statutory audit, its regulatory environment, and introduces governance and professional ethics relating to audit and assurance. It then leads into planning the audit and performing risk assessment.

On successful completion of this paper, candidates should be able to:

  1. Explain the concept of audit and assurance and the functions of audit, corporate governance, including ethics and professional conduct.
  2. Demonstrate how the auditor obtains and accepts audit engagements, obtains an understanding of the entity and its environment, assesses the risk of material misstatement (whether arising from fraud or other irregularities) and plans an audit of financial statements
  3. Describe and evaluate internal controls, techniques and audit tests, including IT systems to identify and communicate control risks and their potential consequences, making appropriate recommendations. Describe the scope, role and function of internal audit.
  4. Identify and describe the work and evidence obtained by the auditor and others required to meet the objectives of audit engagements and the application of the International Standards on Auditing (ISAs)
  5. Explain how consideration of subsequent events and the going concern principle can inform the conclusions from audit work and are reflected in different types of auditor’s report, written representations and the final review and report.

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The syllabus is assessed by a three-hour computer based examination. All questions are compulsory. The exam will contain both computational and discursive elements. Some questions will adopt a scenario/case study approach. Prior to the start of the exam candidates are given an extra 10 minutes to read the exam instructions. .

Section A of the exam comprises three 10 mark case-based questions. Each case has five objective test questions worth 2 marks each.
Section B of the exam comprises one 30 mark question and two 20 mark questions.
Section B of the exam will predominantly examine one or more aspects of audit and assurance from planning and risk assessment, internal control or audit evidence, although topics from other syllabus areas may also be included.

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

(FM) Financial Management

Aim

The aim of the syllabus is to develop the knowledge and skills expected of a finance manager, in relation to investment, financing, and dividend policy decisions.

On successful completion of this paper candidates should be able to:

  1. Discuss the role and purpose of the financial management function
  2. Assess and discuss the impact of the economic environment on financial management
  3. Discuss and apply working capital management techniques
  4. Carry out effective investment appraisal
  5. Identify and evaluate alternative sources of business finance
  6. Discuss and apply principles of business and asset valuations
  7. Explain and apply risk management techniques in business.

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The syllabus is assessed by a three-hour computer based examination.
All questions are compulsory. The exam will contain both computational and discursive elements.
Some questions will adopt a scenario/case study approach.
Prior to the start of the exam candidates are given an extra 10 minutes to read the exam instructions.
Candidates are provided with a formulae sheet and tables of discount and annuity factors.

Section A of the computer-based exam comprises 15 objective test questions of 2 marks each..
Section B of the computer-based exam comprises three questions each containing five objective test questions.
Section C of the exam comprises two 20-mark constructed response questions. The two 20- mark questions will mainly come from the working capital management, investment appraisal and business finance areas of the syllabus. The section A and section B questions can cover any areas of the syllabus.

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

Strategic Professional – The Syllabus

The Strategic Professional exams prepare students for future leadership positions. They develop the strategic vision using your unique blend of technical, ethical and professional skills. And you can specialise in areas that best suit your career ambitions. Students must complete both Essentials exams and choose two of the Options. These exams are:

Essentials

  • (SBL) Strategic Business Leader
  • (SBR) Strategic Business Reporting

Options

  • (APM)  Advanced Performance Management
  • (ATX)  Advanced Taxation
  • (AAA)  Advanced Audit and Assurance

(Please note we do not offer courses towards the option paper APM: Advanced Financial Management)

(SBL) Strategic Business Leader

Aim

SBL mirrors the workplace and provides you with real world challenges allowing you to demonstrate a blend of technical, practical and professional skills. Work through the Ethics and Professional Skills module either before you start, or alongside your studies. This gives you insight into professional skills that you can apply in your exam and in the workplace.

On successful completion of this paper, candidates should be able to:

  1.  Apply excellent leadership and ethical skills to set the ‘tone from the top’ and promote a positive culture within the organisation, adopting a whole organisation perspective in managing performance and value creation.
  2. Evaluate the effectiveness of the governance and agency system of an organisation and recognise the responsibility of the board or other agents towards their stakeholders, including the organisation’s social responsibilities and the reporting implications.
  3. Evaluate the strategic position of the organisation against the external environment and the availability of internal resources, to identify feasible strategic options.
  4. Analyse the risk profile of the organisation and of any strategic options identified, within a culture of responsible risk management.
  5. Select and apply appropriate information technologies and data analytics, to analyse factors affecting the organisation’s value chain to identify strategic opportunities and implement strategic options within a framework of robust IT security controls.
  6. Evaluate management reporting and internal control and audit systems to ensure compliance and the achievement of organisation’s objectives and the safeguarding of organisational assets.
  7. Apply high level financial techniques from the Applied Skills exams in the planning, implementation and evaluation of strategic options and actions.
  8. Enable success through innovative thinking, applying best in class strategies and disruptive technologies in the management of change; initiating, leading and organising projects, while effectively managing talent and other business resources.
  9. Apply a range of Professional Skills in addressing requirements within the Strategic Leader examination and in preparation for, or to support, current work experience.

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The examination is based on an integrated case study containing a number of assignments which will vary at each examination. These assignments or tasks may require the candidate to take on different roles, depending on the situation. The number of marks allocated to all these assignments or the sub-parts of these will add up to 100 in total. Within the total marks available, there are 20 Professional Skills marks. Usually each task will contain some professional skills marks which may vary by examination, depending on the requirements. All tasks must be completed. The examination is of 4 hours duration, but this includes Reading, Planning and Reflection time (RPRT). This time can be used flexibly at any time during the exam

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

(SBR) Strategic Business Reporting

Aim

The Strategic Business Reporting (SBR) exam requires you to demonstrate your ability to make strategic business reporting decisions. Set within the corporate reporting environment you will be tested on concepts, theories, principles and crucially your ability to apply this knowledge to real life scenarios.

On successful completion of this paper candidates should be able to:

  1. Apply fundamental ethical and professional principles to ethical dilemmas and discuss the consequences of unethical behaviour
  2. Evaluate the appropriateness of the financial reporting framework and critically discuss changes in accounting regulation
  3. Apply professional judgement in the reporting of the financial performance of a range of entities NOTE the learning outcomes in Section C of the syllabus can apply to: single entities, groups, public sector entities and not-for profit entities (where appropriate)
  4. Prepare the financial statements of groups of entities
  5. Interpret financial statements for different stakeholders
  6. Communicate the impact of changes and potential changes in accounting regulation on financial reporting

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The syllabus is assessed by a three-hour fifteen minute examination. It examines professional competences within the business reporting environment.

Students will be examined on concepts, theories, and principles, and on their ability to question and comment on proposed accounting treatments.

Students should be capable of relating professional issues to relevant concepts and practical situations. The evaluation of alternative accounting practices and the identification and prioritisation of issues will be a key element of the exam. Professional and ethical judgement will need to be exercised, together with the integration of technical knowledge when addressing business reporting issues in a business context.

Students will be required to adopt either a stakeholder or an external focus in answering questions and to demonstrate personal skills such as problem solving, dealing with information and decision making. Students will also have to demonstrate communication skills appropriate to the scenario.

The exam also deals with specific professional knowledge appropriate to the preparation and presentation of consolidated and other financial statements from accounting data, to conform with accounting standards..

The paper will comprise two sections.

Section A will consist of two scenario based questions that will total 50 marks. The first question will be based on the financial statements of group entities, or extracts thereof (syllabus area D), and is also likely to require consideration of some financial reporting issues (syllabus area C). Candidates should understand that in addition to the consideration of the numerical aspects of group accounting a discussion and explanation of these numbers will also be required. The second question in Section A will require candidates to consider the reporting implications and the ethical implications of specific events in a contemporary scenario.

Section B Students will be required to answer a further two questions in Section B, which may be scenario or case-study or essay based and will contain both discursive and computational elements. Section B could deal with any aspect of the syllabus but will always include either a full question, or part of a question, that requires the appraisal of financial and/or nonfinancial information from either the preparer’s or another stakeholder’s perspective.

Two professional marks will be awarded in Section A and two in Section B.

Current issues The current issues element of the paper (syllabus area F) may be examined in Section A or B but will not be a full question; it is more likely to form part of another question.

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

(APM) Advanced performance Management

Aim

You’ll apply relevant knowledge, skills and exercise professional judgement in selecting and applying strategic management accounting techniques in different business contexts and to contribute to the evaluation of the performance of an organisation and its strategic development.

On successful completion of this paper, candidates should be able to:

  1. Use strategic planning and control models to plan and monitor organisational performance
  2. Assess the impact of risk and uncertainty on organisational performance
  3. Identify and evaluate the design features of effective performance management information and monitoring systems and recognise the impact of developments in technology on performance measurement and management systems.
  4. Apply appropriate strategic performance measurement techniques in evaluating and improving organisational performance
  5. Advise clients and senior management on strategic business performance evaluation and on recognising vulnerability to corporate failure

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The Advanced Performance Management exam builds upon the skills and knowledge examined in the Performance Management exam. At this stage candidates will be expected to demonstrate an integrated knowledge of the subject and an ability to relate their technical understanding of the subject to issues of strategic and operational importance to the organisation. The study guide specifies the wide range of contextual understanding that is required to achieve a satisfactory standard at this level.

Examination Structure The syllabus is assessed by a three-hour 15 minutes examination

Section A of the exam will always be a 50 mark case study based on an organisation in a particular business context.

It will include the organisation’s mission statement and strategic objectives and candidates will be expected to be able to assess the methods by which the organisation is controlling, managing and measuring performance in order to achieve its objectives. This assessment could include an evaluation of the organisation’s performance report, its information systems, new strategies or projects and its performance management and measurement systems. Candidates should understand that they will be expected to undertake calculations, draw comparison against relevant information where appropriate and be prepared to offer alternative recommendations as needed.

Management accountants are required to look across a range of issues which will affect organisational performance, the achievement of objectives and impact on operations and so candidates should expect to see Section A of the exam focus on a range of issues from across syllabus sections A, C and D. These will vary depending on the business context the case study in Section A is based on. Section A will also include four professional marks which will be awarded for the candidate’s approach to the format requested for the answer, for example a report to the Board of Directors.

Section B Candidates will be required to answer a further two 25 mark questions in Section B of the exam, which will normally comprise of scenario based questions.
One of the Section B questions will come mainly from syllabus section E, however the other Section B question can come from any other syllabus section.
Section B questions will also require candidates to address a range of issues influencing performance of organisations in specific business situations.

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

(ATX) Advanced Taxation (UK)

Aim

You’ll apply relevant knowledge and skills and exercise professional judgement in providing relevant information and advice to individuals and businesses on the impact of the major taxes on financial decisions and situations

On successful completion of this paper candidates should be able to:

  1. Apply further knowledge and understanding of the UK tax system through the study of more advanced topics within the taxes studied previously and the study of stamp taxes
  2. Identify and evaluate the impact of relevant taxes on various situations and courses of action, including the interaction of taxes
  3. Provide advice on minimising and/or deferring tax liabilities by the use of standard tax planning measures
  4. Communicate with clients, HM Revenue and Customs and other professionals in an appropriate manner.

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The paper consists of two sections:

Section A consists of two compulsory case-study questions. Question 1 has 35 marks, including four professional marks and question 2 has 25 marks. There will also be five ethics marks included within this section.

Section B consists of two compulsory 20-mark questions, covering both business and personal tax issues.

Candidates will be expected to undertake both calculation and narrative work. The questions will be scenario-based and may involve consideration of more than one tax, some elements of planning and the interaction of taxes.

The examination is a three hour 15 minutes exam.

Tax rates, allowances and information on certain reliefs will be given in the exam.

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

(AAA) Advanced Audit and Assurance

Aim

Study resources for the ACCA exam Advanced Audit and Assurance (AAA). Note that the level of accounting knowledge for AAA is aligned to the SBR syllabus. Students are encouraged to sit and pass SBR before attempting AAA

On successful completion of this paper candidates should be able to:

  1. Recognise the legal and regulatory environment and its impact on audit and assurance practice
  2. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively on an assurance or other service engagement within a professional and ethical framework
  3. Assess and recommend appropriate quality control policies and procedures in practice management and recognise the auditor’s position in relation to the acceptance and retention of professional appointments
  4. Identify and formulate the work required to meet the objectives of audit assignments and apply the International Standards on Auditing
  5. Evaluate findings and the results of work performed and draft suitable reports on assignments
  6. Identify and formulate the work required to meet the objectives of non-audit assignments
  7. Understand the current issues and developments relating to the provision of audit-related and assurance services

Approach to Examining the Syllabus

The Advanced Audit and Assurance exam builds upon the skills and knowledge examined in the Audit and Assurance exam. At this stage candidates will be expected to demonstrate an integrated knowledge of the subject. The study guide specifies the wide range of contextual understanding that is required to achieve a satisfactory standard at this level.

Examination Structure The syllabus is assessed by a three-hour 15 minutes examination

The examination is constructed in two sections. Questions in both sections will be largely discursive. However, candidates will be expected, for example, to be able to assess materiality and calculate relevant ratios where appropriate.

A Section A will comprise a Case Study, worth 50 marks, set at the planning stage of the audit, for a single company, a group of companies or potentially several audit clients. Candidates will be provided with detailed information, which will vary between examinations, but is likely to include extracts of financial information, strategic, operational and other relevant financial information for a client business, as well as extracts from audit working papers, including results of analytical procedures.

Candidates will be required to address a range of requirements, predominantly from syllabus sections A, B, C and D, thereby tackling a real world situation where candidates may have to address a range of issues simultaneously in relation to planning, risk assessment, evidence gathering and ethical and professional considerations. Please note that other syllabus areas, excluding E, may also be drawn on as part of the Case Study.

Four professional marks will be available in Section A and will be awarded based on the level of professionalism with which a candidate’s answer is presented, including the structure and clarity of the answer provided.

Section B will contain two compulsory 25 mark questions, with each being predominately based around a short scenario which may relate to more than one client.

One question will always predominantly come from syllabus section E, and consequently candidates should be prepared to answer a question relating to completion, review and reporting. There are a number of formats this question could adopt, including, but not limited to, requiring candidates to assess going concern, the impact of subsequent events, evaluating identified misstatements and the corresponding effect on the auditor’s report. Candidates may also be asked to critique an auditor’s report or evaluate the matters to be included in a report which is to be provided to management or those charged with governance.

The other Section B question can be drawn from any other syllabus section, including A, B, C, D and F.

Quality control and ethics The auditor’s assessment of effective quality control procedures and consideration of ethical issue are fundamental to all stages of the audit and therefore these concepts could be examined in any section of the exam.

Current issues Syllabus section G on current issues may be examined in Section A or B as appropriate. Current issues is unlikely to form the basis of any question on its own but instead will be incorporated into the Case Study or either of the Section B questions dependent on question content and the topical issues affecting the profession at the time of writing.

For full details on the syllabus content, visit the ACCA website

Full Link & Revision Courses

Our face-to-face classroom based tuition courses provide students with the knowledge to help them pass their ACCA exams. We run full link courses comprising of a tuition course in 2 separate phases and a revision course.The tuition element covers the main areas of the syllabus and the revision course culminates with question practice and a full mock exam either taken as a whole mock or a question based day (QBD). Tutors and professional markers are on-site to mark the questions on a QBD and provide immediate feedback and question de-briefs.

Students can attend a full link course or for those who may be re-sitting or have taken a home study course, a revision only course can be attended.

Some courses are integrated – ie all days have to be attended as both tuition and question practice are combined throughout the course duration.

Class sizes are small allowing plenty of opportunities to interact with the course tutor. All tutors are qualified accountants with many years practical and teaching experience and a proven track record.

Students have email access to the subject tutor who will provide remote assistance during periods of home study and leading up to the exam.

The following course materials are provided within the course fee:

  • Study text
  • Revision question bank
  • Revision cards
  • Course notes

Students can attend on a residential or non-residential basis. Self service breakfast and lunch are provided to all students attending our courses at no extra charge.

For details on pass rates, full course brochure and a manual enrolment form, please see ‘downloads’ on right of page

Residential Options

For students who wish to stay overnight, we offer highly competitive rates on a full board basis – providing you with a study-bedroom and all meals on site. You don’t have to spend any time travelling to and from courses and can focus solely on your learning. Our accommodation rates compare very favourably to hotel costs enabling us to maximise the value of your spend on professional development. The rooms come as either a shared room, a single room or our recently refurbished premium en-suite rooms.
The premium rooms come with en-suite as standard and with a range of single, double or king-sized beds. We advise booking early to avoid disappointment as en-suite rooms are limited. Residential fees start from £48/night on a full board basis. Accommodation can be booked when enrolling on the course.

CBE Exam Centre

Reed Business School is an ACCA CBE exam centre for BT/FBT/MA/FMA/FA/FFA and LW.

If you are wish to book your exam with us, please complete our ACCA enrolment form. If you are not attending one of our courses and you wish to book your ACCA CBE with us, please download our computer based exam (CBE) dates, complete and return a booking form to us. Please note places are subject to availability.

The Business School is not an ACCA exam centre for any non on-demand subjects . Please refer to the ACCA website for information on booking exams.

Pass Rates

Reed Business School is Platinum accredited by ACCA, the highest awarding accreditation. Part of our accreditation includes analysis of our student pass rates.

We are the only accountancy tuition provider who openly publishes all exam results, providing a transparent and detailed breakdown of results achieved by students attending our ACCA courses.

See details of our pass rates the the last few exam sittings



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